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The Lebanese Civil War in Our classes: A Taboo Worth Getting Rid Of

The Lebanese Civil war is one of the topics that many schools reject tackling or are conservative about, particularly in a country where history is not something agreed upon. However, to develop students who can be contributors to economy and social change, such topics are mandatory for learning to analyze historical records and thinking critically about historical eras is what builds a true local and global citizen.
Being a pilot school in the "Teaching Divided Histories" initiative was a chance we took advantage of to develop individuals allowing them to explore, express, exchange, evaluate, and exhibit. In Collaboration with the British Council, our high school students worked on the TDH pilot program and learnt through the experiences of Northern Ireland's Civil Rights movement how to resolve political conflicts peacefully. When comparing this war to what happened in Lebanon between the year 1975 and 1990, students used their inquiry skills to undertake historical investigation, critical thinking skills to evaluate evidence and appreciate different interpretations, chronological awareness skills to make connections between historical periods, events and turning points, and ICT skills to create their comic book about major understandings attained and to work on a movie maker using "Audacity" as well. Above all, they practiced the ability to challenge stereotypical viewpoints through studying historical periods, global contexts, significant political, social, economic, cultural, and religious aspects.
on Tuesday, March 31, our students reaped their hard work through being able to present their learning journey to the national and international community through the TDH pilot ceremony held in Holiday Inn Dunes with the presence of the British ambassador Tom Fletcher, the British Council country director Mrs. Donna Mc.Gowan, the president of the center for Educational Research and development Mrs. Nada Oweijane, and few participating shools. Three representatives from Houssam Eddine Hariri High School shared the work of over 80 students who dared read history and judge their past. Their work took the attention of all esteemed guests and the appreciation of representatives of the ministry of education who demanded a copy of the whole learning process along with the final action plan, which was done across a team of teachers at school. The language teacher, the ICT teacher, the history teacher and the inquisitive and motivated students contributed to make it an innovative interdisciplinary successful unit that is now part of our curriculum.
 

Zeina Dbouk, English Language teacher